Bird Tales

We are always interested in the birds that visit our garden. We grow a variety of plants without pesticides to encourage the greatest possible number of species to drop by. Of course sometimes they want to share our food as well.

Once again my strawberries are being eaten by one of the local Pied Currawongs and recently the Crimson Rosellas have been helping themselves to our sunflowers.

Crimson Rosellas helping themselves to our sunflower seeds.
Crimson Rosellas helping themselves to our sunflower seeds.

To be fair I hadn’t realised that there were seeds in the flowers until the birds started eating them. I thought the flowers had died off because of the very high temperatures at the time. The dead florets were hiding the seeds that sit below them. We are actually growing the sunflowers for our chickens to eat – they just love the seeds – so it was a fine irony to see their seeds being eaten by wild birds just outside the chicken run. However I did manage to save some seeds so the chickens will not miss out entirely. I hope we may get some more flowers after all the rain that we’ve just had.

Sunflower seeds drying out.
Sunflower seeds drying out.

Speaking of chickens, our White Leghorn has decided to go out in sympathy with all those people overseas who are experiencing massive snow storms. She is currently moulting and I can barely keep up with removing her feathers from the run. Wherever she goes in the garden she leaves a white trail behind her. At least she’ll be pristine white again soon.

Letty loses it all over the chicken run. Artemesia looks on amused.
Letty loses it all over the chicken run, while Artemesia looks on.

Last but not least, except in size, the diminutive Superb Blue Wrens have been making a visit to our yard. These tiny birds, 14 cm from beak to tail, (approx. 5″ for those who aren’t metrically inclined), were just voted Australia’s favourite bird. As you can see from the pictures below they are very cute.

The male Superb Blue Wren has striking electric blue markings.
The male Superb Blue Wren has striking electric blue markings.

This male arrived with his ‘group’ of 4 females, who are not very noticeable at all. Their dull colouring, as you can see, allows them to hide more safely from predators while they are nesting.

The female Superb Fairy Wren,( just near the tip of big red arrow).
The female Superb Fairy Wren,( just near the tip of big red arrow).

 

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