Bean counting!

The front vaggie patch in early March

After the rocky start to our summer gardening season, we have by stint of watering, persistant snail removal and good summer rainfall, managed to get our best ever crop of beans! I have picked over 2.5 kilos of beans in the past two weeks and over the same time 4 kilos of tomatoes. 

The same patch today with bountiful tomatoes barely contained in their frames

Apart from eating a goodly amount of beans and tomatoes I am also doing a lot of saving for future meals. The beans are being sliced, blanched and then frozen … 

Beans ready for the frezer

… I am roasting the tomatoes, to concentrate their sweet flavour, before bottling them in sterilised jars for future use. 

Roasted tomatoes in jars from my latest batch
The best thing is there are still  plenty more where they came from.

Hard yakka

First cob of corn for dinner

It was a perfect afternoon to get into the garden, sunny enough with a nice breeze. I was working in the front garden, planting out some daisy cuttings and pulling out a dead shrub.

The biggest issue was whether the bull ants (inch ants) were still nesting next to the dead shrub. And yes they are. However I did manage to dig out pretty much all the dead stuff before the ants came charging out. Having been bitten earlier in the week I was being quite careful.

I rounded out the afternoon by harvesting all the good sized Blue Lake climbing beans and picking our first cob of corn. We are now getting a steady feed from our tomatoes and fruit from our fig tree is making dessert choices easy.

Fig tart for dessert

Although we are not the only ones lining up for a feed. Our resident Grey Currawong loves our figs as much as we do.

Not bad for a bird with only one eye! We gave him/her this one.

Over the garden fence, again

I’ve checked and it’s been five years since I last posted about visiting an open garden! During that time the Australian Open Garden Scheme has met its end and it’s been left to the various states and territories to keep the movement going. Here, Open Gardens Canberra has taken up the challenge and is running the new scheme.

Last week I saw a notice that three gardens were open this weekend, two private and one community garden. We only made it to two gardens but they both turned out to be worth the visit.

First stop was Isobel’s garden in Dickson, where her back and front yard have undergone an almost complete re-vamp since the house was rebuilt in 2001. I must say I’m biased because she has a similar layout to Chez Fork, with a combination of predominantly Australian plants and a big veggie garden.

isobel1
The view across Isobel’s back garden

As the internal divisions of the garden beds are not fixed, Isobel has used off-cuts of artificial grass (left over from the local school) to form temporary pathways. It’s apparently worked quite well, both at suppressing the weeds and providing a readily moved path. However she did warn against walking on the ‘grass’ on a hot day with bare feet!

fakegrass
Artificial grass paths between the potatoes and the tomatoes

She also has some lovely, simple water features under a large specimen of Silver-leaved Mountain Gum (Eucalyptus pulverulenta), which she grew from seed  she collected near Bathurst.

isobel2
Simple water features under the Silver-leaved Mountain Gum
isobel4
Another view of the garden across the pumpkin vines

Our second stop was the Charnwood Community Garden, which was established in the late 1980’s by the Canberra Organic Growers Society. Here there are over 40 plots of varying sizes. There were a number of plot-holders on hand to discuss the finer points of their gardens.

charnwood-comm
Looking across the Charnwood Community Garden

I really enjoyed seeing the variety of colourful crops and flowers being grown in the plots.

I was pleased to be able to talk to one of the plot-holders who had the most  vigorous crop of sweet potatoes (a.k.a. yams, kumara) growing. I hadn’t realised that it was possible to grow these in Canberra, because our winters are so frosty, but here is the proof.

sweet-potato
More sweet potato than you can poke a stick at!

Even better I was told that the yield was more than three times that of the potatoes he also grew. I know that this is one crop we will be trying out next year! He also had a great crop of snakebeans, which his partner preferred over regular climbing beans, as she had less ‘top and tailing’ to do for the same weight of beans. This tropical variety of bean (Vigna sp.) has turned out to be a good grower in Canberra’s ever increasing hotter summers. I also saw that these beans were growing in Isobel’s  garden.

Of course being gardeners it wasn’t long before we were sharing tips and favourite tool recommendations. The best ‘idea I plan to steal’, came from the community garden where one gardener was using an old bicycle wheel, atop a hardwood pole as a frame for growing his climbing beans. Pieces of twine were hung from the rim of the wheel and as the beans started to send out tendrils these strings were directed to where the plant could find them. The twine was only secured at the top, the beans kept things secured at the bottom.

I have to conclude with thanks to the gardeners who so generously offered me some seeds from their patches (and I didn’t even ask!). A variety of long tomato called Sherry’s Sweet (which I have only spotted in US lists, but was previously available through the Diggers Club in Australia). Also a climbing butter bean, which the grower’s father bought commercially from the now defunct Walton’s department store in the mid-1970’s and which, the family has been growing ever since. (I see that Diggers Club is now offering these beans, which I understand to have come from this same grower).

openseeds
Sherry’s Sweet tomato and climbing butter beans