Peas Please

With spring well underway all those peas I planted out several months ago are now starting to deliver. We had our first meal incorporating them last night – TB’s version of Mapo Tofu with some peas and asparagus for added flavour.

Massey bush peas, great for a small garden.
Massey bush peas, great for a small garden.

The first out of the pod are the Massey bush pea (above) which grow lots of pods on compact bushes. They are great for a small garden.

It will only be another day or two before we start harvesting our climbing peas. This year I have planted Alderman and Purple Podded Peas.

Alderman climbing peas.
Alderman climbing peas.

The Aldermans are galloping up the wire so quickly that we’ve had to tie a rather Heath Robinson arrangement of ex-curtain trim around the top of the stakes to try and provide some more support.

I’ve planted my favourite Purple Podded climbing peas in the front garden, where their striking two tone pink and purple flowers have already been mistaken for sweet-peas by a passing neighbour.

Purple Podded Peas, both the flowers and the pods make an attractive display.
Purple Podded Peas, both the flowers and the pods make an attractive display.

I do plant some peas just for the shear pleasure of their flowers. I love the many varieties of Australian native peas, such as this Mirbelia oxyloboides. I purchased this plant from a weekend market while I was on holidays in Bairnsdale several years ago – now I wish I’d bought more.

Mirbelia oxyloboides.

These plants bring to mind a scene I experienced in Namadgi National Park many years ago. Walking along the fire trails at Mt Ginini we could see the surrounding mountain slopes covered with thousands of flowering orange pea plants – quite amazing!

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